Slow roast Spanish pork belly

I have no idea if they cook pork belly this way in Spain, but if they do not, they certainly should. The flavours I have used a definitely Spanish.

The meat came out very tender and succulent, and the crackling was crunchy and tasty. The key is roasting the skin at a high temperature then allowing the meat to slowly simmer in liquid.

I served this pork belly as part of a stunningly gourmet sandwich with brioche bun, spicy barbecue sauce, and red cabbage and fennel slaw, which I highly recommend. The recipes are all linked above.

Ingredients

Method

  1. Combine the olive oil, paprika, cayenne and salt in a small bowl and set aside
  2. Pre-heat your oven to 220ºC
  3. Score the skin, cutting through the top but not all the way to the meat. Prop the belly up on an angle, and pour the boiling water over the skin so that it runs off. The boiling water lighly blisters the skin to produce crisp crackling. Pat dry the belly with a paper towel then place skin side down in a roasting pan only a little larger than the belly.
  4. Brush on the olive oil marinade onto the bottom of the belly and the sides, then flip the belly over and paste the skin as well.
  5. Place the roasting pan into the oven for twenty minutes.
  6. Pull the pan out and pull the fino sherry into the pan. Place back into the oven and roast for a further 20 minutes.
  7. Turn the pan around then add 2 cups of the vegetable stock to the pan. Place back into the oven and roast for a further 20 minutes.
  8. Add the rest of the vegetable stock, turn down the oven to 130ºC and cook for two hours.
  9. Allow the belly to rest in the liquid for 20 minutes, then pull out and cut up. The crackling should be a dark brown and very crisp, and the meat should be able to be pulled apart.
  10. To serve, cut the brioche buns in half, place the barbecue sauce on the bottom, followed by the pork, then top with the slaw and the brioche top.

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